Old School

Michael Pineda

The silliness of Major League Baseball was captured in one single moment last night on the mound at Fenway Park. The umpiring crew surrounded Michael Pineda as crew chief Gerry Davis examined New York Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda after the accusation from Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell that Pineda had pine tar “all over his neck”.

Of course, there was pine tar. Pineda was cheating. He was subsequently ejected in the 2nd inning to the dismay of Yankees manager Joe GIradi. No one is too shocked or outraged. This is Major League Baseball. Wake us up when something newsworthy happens, right?

It is a cliché to call any type of backwards thinking Neanderthal-like but that’s what Major League Baseball is. Aside from FIFA, there isn’t a league in the world that is more behind the times than the MLB. Despite the abundance of statistics that is so pervasive in the game these days, the old school mentality from managers, coaches and commentators still dominates many aspects of the way the MLB operates.

Michael Pineda and pine tar-gate is a microcosm of everything that is wrong with baseball yet the MLB is about as active as a Prince Fielder in the off-season in changing the game for the better. Pineda was put on “unofficial probation” after camera’s caught him using pine tar in his April 10th start against the Red Sox with no regard for discretion or subtlety. Pineda did not care and neither did the Red Sox apparently.

Pineda’s use of pine tar on April 10th was about as discreet as a pot smoker on 4:20 but the umpires didn’t do a damn thing about it because no one brought it to their attention. It’s part of the large unwritten “code” in baseball that pitchers use a variety of foreign substances to help them on the mound.

Don’t ask, don’t tell.

For some reason, everyone involved around the game of baseball accepts it for what it is. There isn’t a sport where cheating is more universally recognized and allowed within the confines of the game than baseball.

The substance abuse problem among pitchers is the MLB’s version of the don’t ask, don’t tell policy and it is just the tip of the iceberg. While America’s pastime has been surpassed by both football and basketball in the last decade, Bud Selig and Major League Baseball have sat back and watched it happen. Wilfully blind to the plethora of issues that need to be addressed. They foolishly allow the game to be subjugated to the “this is how the game was always played” old school mind-set.

Coming up with solutions to the game, any game, is America’s true greatest pastime. Everyone thinks they have the answers, if only someone would listen to them.

However, some of the fixes needed in the MLB are so obvious, a six-year-old child could figure out what the right thing to do is. Even a first-grader knows the difference between right and wrong, and a number of problems in the MLB simply have to do with enforcing the rules.

In this post-steroid age, scoring runs are at an all-time low in the MLB but the league continues to give the pitcher every advantage possible. This isn’t 1964 anymore. Blatant stupidity/laziness from guys like Michael Pineda should not be the only cases where enforcement of the rule should occur. The don’t ask, don’t tell policy regarding pine tar, sunscreen or any other foreign substance is as nonsensical as it gets.

Hitting is harder than ever with constant defensive shifts, 95mph fastballs as common as the cold and guys like Pineda given mostly free rein to do whatever they want to the baseball on the mound. Nevertheless, we have the old school commentators like Buck Martinez and Joe Buck clamouring that the strike zone needs to be more liberal than it already is to speed up the game.

Make hitting harder to speed up the game? Fixing one problem by exasperating another is not how you go about improving anything.

If baseball could learn anything from football and basketball, it’s that more scoring is the goal. Bud Selig, or anyone who works at Major League Baseball for that matter, has yet to get the memo. In 2013 and 2014, the amount of runs scored per game in the MLB has not been this low since 1992.

The most frustrating aspect of this is some of these problems are as simple as ensuring umpires do their jobs and carry out the rules properly. Don’t allow pitchers to use foreign substances. Don’t allow pitchers to throw strikes three inches off the plate. Don’t allow pitchers to take over 30 seconds in between pitches.

I doubt Bud Selig has any trouble sleeping, but if he ever lies in bed at night wondering why they’re losing out to the NFL and NBA, maybe he should realize that not many people can handle three to four hours of pitching dominance.

Michael Pineda and pine tar-gate, in itself, is not all that interesting. Pineda will get suspended, come back and probably do it all over again. Nothing will change as a result of this story. Major League Baseball will continue to stand idly by as the NFL and NBA surpass them in every possible way.

The issues the league faces are not complicated. Any small child could understand what needs to be done. Enforce the rules.

But then again, that would be too easy.

Agree? Disagree? Reply in the comments section below or e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com

Also, you can follow me on twitter @chrisrossPTB and I will happily return the favour.

About Chris Ross
Questions, comments, suggestions? Send yours to cross_can15@hotmail.com. Follow me on twitter @paintstheblack

6 Responses to Old School

  1. Sheer class as only baseball can continue to shoot itself in the foot and an @ss like Bud Selig claims that the game is still very much beloved by the fans . What world is he actually living in , unless it’s the one where the likes of Olney , Gammons and Kurkjian are repeatedly kissing his @ss or licking his sphincter as only they can .

  2. buddad1957 says:

    It is hard not to agree with everything you said. Watching the homerun derby should remind everyone how hard it is to hit a baseball. Throwing up fat, down the middle balls wind up with more “outs” than homeruns. You’d think that hitters would want to see pitchers who can control the ball being thrown! Give ‘em pinetar, let them use it!

  3. buddad1957 says:

    Can you explain the reference, “about as discreet as a pot smoker on 4:20.”?

  4. SportsChump says:

    Baseball backward thinking?

    That’s being polite.

    They can’t even figure out how to properly work instant replay.

    Might I suggest rewind, play and watch.

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