Old School

Michael Pineda

The silliness of Major League Baseball was captured in one single moment last night on the mound at Fenway Park. The umpiring crew surrounded Michael Pineda as crew chief Gerry Davis examined New York Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda after the accusation from Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell that Pineda had pine tar “all over his neck”.

Of course, there was pine tar. Pineda was cheating. He was subsequently ejected in the 2nd inning to the dismay of Yankees manager Joe GIradi. No one is too shocked or outraged. This is Major League Baseball. Wake us up when something newsworthy happens, right?

It is a cliché to call any type of backwards thinking Neanderthal-like but that’s what Major League Baseball is. Aside from FIFA, there isn’t a league in the world that is more behind the times than the MLB. Despite the abundance of statistics that is so pervasive in the game these days, the old school mentality from managers, coaches and commentators still dominates many aspects of the way the MLB operates.

Michael Pineda and pine tar-gate is a microcosm of everything that is wrong with baseball yet the MLB is about as active as a Prince Fielder in the off-season in changing the game for the better. Pineda was put on “unofficial probation” after camera’s caught him using pine tar in his April 10th start against the Red Sox with no regard for discretion or subtlety. Pineda did not care and neither did the Red Sox apparently.

Pineda’s use of pine tar on April 10th was about as discreet as a pot smoker on 4:20 but the umpires didn’t do a damn thing about it because no one brought it to their attention. It’s part of the large unwritten “code” in baseball that pitchers use a variety of foreign substances to help them on the mound.

Don’t ask, don’t tell.

For some reason, everyone involved around the game of baseball accepts it for what it is. There isn’t a sport where cheating is more universally recognized and allowed within the confines of the game than baseball.

The substance abuse problem among pitchers is the MLB’s version of the don’t ask, don’t tell policy and it is just the tip of the iceberg. While America’s pastime has been surpassed by both football and basketball in the last decade, Bud Selig and Major League Baseball have sat back and watched it happen. Wilfully blind to the plethora of issues that need to be addressed. They foolishly allow the game to be subjugated to the “this is how the game was always played” old school mind-set.

Coming up with solutions to the game, any game, is America’s true greatest pastime. Everyone thinks they have the answers, if only someone would listen to them.

However, some of the fixes needed in the MLB are so obvious, a six-year-old child could figure out what the right thing to do is. Even a first-grader knows the difference between right and wrong, and a number of problems in the MLB simply have to do with enforcing the rules.

In this post-steroid age, scoring runs are at an all-time low in the MLB but the league continues to give the pitcher every advantage possible. This isn’t 1964 anymore. Blatant stupidity/laziness from guys like Michael Pineda should not be the only cases where enforcement of the rule should occur. The don’t ask, don’t tell policy regarding pine tar, sunscreen or any other foreign substance is as nonsensical as it gets.

Hitting is harder than ever with constant defensive shifts, 95mph fastballs as common as the cold and guys like Pineda given mostly free rein to do whatever they want to the baseball on the mound. Nevertheless, we have the old school commentators like Buck Martinez and Joe Buck clamouring that the strike zone needs to be more liberal than it already is to speed up the game.

Make hitting harder to speed up the game? Fixing one problem by exasperating another is not how you go about improving anything.

If baseball could learn anything from football and basketball, it’s that more scoring is the goal. Bud Selig, or anyone who works at Major League Baseball for that matter, has yet to get the memo. In 2013 and 2014, the amount of runs scored per game in the MLB has not been this low since 1992.

The most frustrating aspect of this is some of these problems are as simple as ensuring umpires do their jobs and carry out the rules properly. Don’t allow pitchers to use foreign substances. Don’t allow pitchers to throw strikes three inches off the plate. Don’t allow pitchers to take over 30 seconds in between pitches.

I doubt Bud Selig has any trouble sleeping, but if he ever lies in bed at night wondering why they’re losing out to the NFL and NBA, maybe he should realize that not many people can handle three to four hours of pitching dominance.

Michael Pineda and pine tar-gate, in itself, is not all that interesting. Pineda will get suspended, come back and probably do it all over again. Nothing will change as a result of this story. Major League Baseball will continue to stand idly by as the NFL and NBA surpass them in every possible way.

The issues the league faces are not complicated. Any small child could understand what needs to be done. Enforce the rules.

But then again, that would be too easy.

Agree? Disagree? Reply in the comments section below or e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com

Also, you can follow me on twitter @chrisrossPTB and I will happily return the favour.

This Needs to Stop

Alex Rodriguez

Other than FIFA, the MLB is the world’s most archaic league. No professional sports league in North America is as slow at adapting to modern changes than Major League Baseball. It took a lifetime in and a half for Bud Selig to finally install an expanded replay system.

While the importance of history in the game of baseball cannot be underscored, its rich history prevents the league from moving forward. The illogical phrase preventing change of “this is how it has always been done” rings truer in the game of baseball than it does anywhere else.

Last night, Boston Red Sox pitcher Ryan Dempster gave us his variation of the ever-constant vigilante justice we see in baseball. Dempster took it upon himself to send a cryptic message to Alex Rodriguez. He threw one pitch behind his knees, two pitches far enough inside for a half-blind person to understand what was going on and finally plunked A-Rod high and tight.

It was an unprecedented moment in MLB history.

I can’t lie. I smiled after seeing that 4th pitch bean baseball’s most polarizing figure since Barry Bonds retire. My baseball coach in high school, Dave Empey, was Ryan Dempster’s coach and is still his friend to this day. When I saw that 4th pitch fly into A-Rod’s elbow, I could hear Dave, in his old, cranky voice telling us in one of his pre-game speeches, “Ryan Dempster was a man!” Granted, Ryan Dempster doesn’t have to bat in the American league.

However, the biggest takeaway from this incident has to be the MLB’s ignorance of the vigilante justice that has been as integral to the game of baseball as the Kardashian’s are to late-night TV writers. Players and fans accept it, as we do with so many other things in society, because “that’s the way it has always been done.”

The vigilante justice pitchers impose when they bean an opposing does make some sense. Human beings are wired for revenge. An eye for an eye, right?

In this day and age though, that foolhardy acceptance of such a simple concept needs to change before someone gets hurt.

There has been no hotter topic than the issue of concussions in sports over the past few years. The NFL and NHL have gone out of their respective ways in attempts to minimize head injuries. The games have changed as a result of it.

The MLB is happy with vigilante justice. It means that, for the most part, they don’t have to deal with the straining process of determining suspensions. Accepting and recognizing it as simply a part of the game ensures that they don’t have to be the bad guy. Say what you want about Roger Goodell, but he has no qualms with being the bad cop.

Although the concept of vigilante justice does make some sense, when you break it down, it’s about as ridiculous as a monkey wearing a cowboy hat and riding a dog. Players hurl a rock hard object, the baseball, at the bodies and sometimes heads of opposing batters at speeds of 90-100 mph from 60 feet away. It may be considered justice in the game of baseball but, in a court of law, that sounds a helluva lot like assault with a deadly weapon.

Yet the majority of players and fans still seem to be fine with it.

Ryan Dempster continued to pitch. Joe Giradi was ejected for standing up for what was right. Curt Schilling said on the radio this morning that he couldn’t believe that C.C. Sabathia didn’t take it upon himself to stand up for his teammate.

Baseball mentality at its finest.

The MLB has been lucky. Despite the countless number of balls that have flown intentionally and unintentionally at the heads of players, no one has been seriously injured or killed. This may sound crazy but the ‘law of being due’ ominously looms over the game like a dark, stormy cloud. With the amount of balls that are purposefully flung at delicate human heads, it’s only a matter of time before someone sustains a life threatening injury.

It just takes one ball to hit the wrong spot, helmet or no helmet.

Major League Baseball has to get a better handle on this. Pitchers who intentionally toss balls at players should be suspended. A zero tolerance policy. It takes something to the degree of what Ryan Dempster did yesterday for the MLB to hand out one of those 6 game, 1 start suspensions.

Those 6 game suspensions have to be the bare minimum. Even though I still smirk when I think about Dempster’s best Batman impersonation, he needs to be made an example of. I know he won’t be but he should be. It can’t be up to the pitchers to do the dirty work. It’s not fair to the pitchers and it’s even less fair to the often time’s innocent (star) players who have to bear the brunt of the pitcher’s dirty work.

I don’t think I can count on my fingers how many times Bryce Harper has been thrown at in his very short MLB career.

Like so many things in life, significant penalties are the only way to change the culture. It’s the only way vigilante justice in baseball can be reined in. We can’t continue to stand idly by and tolerate players putting their lives on the line every time a team feels the need for retribution.

This is an important issue that is constantly swept under the rug by that dreaded nostalgic mantra. I get it. That’s how it has always been done.

But, come on. Let’s not wait until something tragic happens.

Agree? Disagree? Reply in the comments section below or e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com

Also, you can follow me on twitter @chrisrossPTB and I will happily return the favour.

Creating Meaning Out of Chaos

John Buck was calling the pitches at the 2010 all-star game when Brian McCann hit the game deciding 3-run double in the 7th inning. What does John Buck have to do with anything? John Buck represents what is wrong with Major League Baseball’s mid-summer classic.

It probably wasn’t John Buck’s fault that Brian McCann whacked a double giving the National League home field advantage in the 2010 World Series. It also probably didn’t matter to John Buck who was playing for the perennially mediocre Toronto Blue Jays last season. He was calling pitches in a game that he probably didn’t expect to be in before the season had started.

Bud Selig’s attempt to inject more life into the slowly dying lure of all-star games should be applauded but this isn’t right.

Related: Get Rid of ‘Em

Baseball’s all-star game is flooded with an excess of players and a need to get each one into the game. Those guys deserve it. They deserve the opportunity to play.

It’s the World Series teams who don’t deserve it. They don’t deserve what the all-star game now stands for. The most important game is decided in the most chaotic way possible by a majority of players who couldn’t care less. At least one player has to be chosen from each team and they could possibly be the most important player in the game. Most important, not most valuable.

The all-star game is a circus but it’s still a good circus. All the best players in the world are put on one field to showcase their talent. It doesn’t have to be anything more than that.

I don’t mind seeing managers struggle to find playing time for position players while having to protect the arms of pitchers.

I can’t bear watching mangers try to organize a circus all while facing the pressure of winning a potentially very meaningful game.

The all-star game is played run more like a high school PE class yet the implications are more like a World Series title. Oh wait, it is a World Series title.

The math doesn’t add up.

Baseball is the one sport that doesn’t have to worry about their players giving a full effort. Baseball is the one sport where players will give their full effort because it’s almost impossible not to. Just ask Pete Rose.

All-star games are made to be fun but the never-ending drive for higher ratings has attempted to create real meaning where there isn’t meant to be any. Throwing together 50 guys for one game and telling them that the outcome of a world championship could depend on them is incredibly illogical.

In the end, you have 3rd and 4th string “all-stars” playing in crunch time. John Buck could be behind the plate not getting on his knees to block a ball with a guy on third base with 2 outs in the bottom of the 9th inning. No, that didn’t actually didn’t happen but it seems like something Mr. Buckaroo could pull off.

All-star games are going the way of MySpace but there are other ways to fix it. Since 2003, when the home-field advantage rule was implemented, ratings have not increased in the slightest. The ratings have fluctuated from a 9.5 in 2003 to an all-time low of 7.5 in 2010. No more, no less.

To put that into perspective, ratings throughout the 90’s never reached below an 11.8 and were as high as 17.4.

Obviously, this ploy hasn’t done anything to improve the all-star game’s ratings. The controversy and buzz generated from the rule still isn’t bringing fans to watch the game.

This failed attempt to boost ratings has to be scrapped. They aren’t letting the people who should be deciding their fate do the deciding for themselves. The all-star game may only decide one game but it’s one game that the team’s playing in have virtually no control over. Home-field advantage should be determined by how the respective teams have played throughout the year.

Contract rosters, change the way players are chosen, pay the players, drop the fan vote. It is anyone’s guess on what the best way to fix the all-star game is. I have no idea.

All I know is that home-field advantage should not be on the line at the annual mid-summer classic.

Agree? Disagree? If you have any questions, comments, suggestions, please feel free to reply in the comments section below. Or you can e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com. Also, follow me on twitter @paintstheblack and I will gladly return the favour.

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Mark Cuban is Perfect for the Dodgers

It may have taken a while but Mark Cuban brought a championship to the Dallas Mavericks. He could do the same for the LA Dodgers.

Bud Selig is a stubborn man. A gentleman of his age, and I use that term lightly, has trouble adapting to new situations. Selig wants to stick with what he knows well. He wants to turn down that awful sounding auto-tune on MTV and keep that Bing Crosby record on the player.

The Dodgers are now in turmoil but Selig still isn’t going to do a damned thing about it. He doesn’t want Cuban rattling any cages. He likes things just the way they are. Bud Selig is once again ignoring a wonderful opportunity to improve his fading product.

The NFL and NBA are taking over the sport of baseball yet Selig doesn’t mind being a spectator. He has the ultimate power to make a difference but chooses otherwise. It’s as if Batman decided that he wasn’t going to protect Gotham.

Maybe Batman is a bit farfetched for the black-hearted nature of the Bud. However, the amount of power that he consistently fails to utilize isn’t.

Mark Cuban would give fans a reason to tune in to watch Major League Baseball.

In a league where the salary cap exists as much as the aliens at Area 51, Cuban’s spendthrift ways would bring the Dodgers to new heights. He would bring Steinbrenner money with a Hollywood personality. Mark Cuban is LA.

Bringing a major market franchise back to relevancy is no doubt high on Selig’s priority list. Without Mark Cuban, the task becomes significantly more difficult.

Love him (which you should) or hate him, a Mark Cuban led team would draw interest. For fans, half the fun of professional sports is finding teams to root for and against. With Mark Cuban, the casual fan will tune in to see how his team fares.

Creating a buzz around a sport that is dominated by Lebron James TV specials and Tom Brady hair talk is exactly what baseball needs. It’s about time someone ruffled a few feathers. Opinionated, arrogant and brash. What more could the sport ask for?

Related: Something’s Gotta Give

This would be the New York Yankees acquiring Ozzie Guillen to be their head coach.

Bud Selig has finally found some steadiness in baseball with steroids becoming a thing of the past.

Admitting that he was wrong for not allowing Mark Cuban to buy the Cubs two years back would take away from the steady path that Selig covets but it would give him plenty of street cred around North America. People would start putting Bud Selig and the game of baseball a bit higher in their books. Hard to believe that this can all happen because of one man.

The amount of excitement that merely talk of Mark Cuban possibly landing an MLB franchise is astounding. The amount of hope a software geek can bring to America’s pastime is evidence in itself. The LA Dodgers going bankrupt is the best thing for baseball if it means that Mark Cuban could be part of the exclusive club.

People get the message. Fans want Cuban in. The only person that doesn’t want to listen is Bud Selig.

Agree? Disagree? If you have any questions, comments, suggestions, please feel free to reply in the comments section below. Or you can e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com. Also, follow me on twitter @paintstheblack and I will gladly return the favour.

Subscribe to my blog too and you can get the latest posts such as Flyer Shocker Reeks of “Same Old, Same Old”

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