The Magic of Tim Tebow

There’s the magic of Tim Tebow. Mike Mayock said it and everyone else watching Thursday night’s game against the Jets was thinking it.

Tim Tebow did his thing in the final 5 minutes of the game. His team needed a field goal but in typical Tebow fashion, he drove down the field for a go-ahead touchdown. With 58 seconds left to play, Tebow put his team up by 4 points and for another week has silenced the critics.

OK, partially silenced.

Tim Tebow’s magic isn’t real. I’m still not buying it. His comebacks amaze me but it’s all smoke and mirrors. Tebow is giving America a great show. Maybe Las Vegas will give him a call soon. He could have one of those high-priced, fancy shows with all the extravagant lights and sounds.

The thing about all magic shows is that they are illusions. A good magic show will put you in awe, make you ask how in the name of Tebow did he do that but in the end you know you’re just getting fooled.

Tim Tebow has two things going for him: He has great feel for the game and he knows how to come through in the clutch.

I keep hearing that winning is the bottom line. Winning is not the bottom line. At least, winning the way Tim Tebow has is not the bottom line.

The bottom line is that Tim Tebow can’t play quarterback and win in the NFL.

He marched his team down the field for a game winning drive but he should never have had the opportunity to do so in the first place. Tim Tebow has taken advantage of his opportunities but the way he is playing, those opportunities shouldn’t be coming around as often as they have.

At some point, Tim Tebow’s luck is going to run out.

Mark Sanchez isn’t always going to be there to throw an unnecessary pick six. Matt Cassel won’t always be around to run a hapless offence. A matchup against the miserable Miami Dolphins squad that can’t recover an onside kick doesn’t come standard in the NFL.

If the Denver Broncos were any good offensively they would have blown those 3 teams out of the water.

His one decent outing against the Oakland Raiders came with a side of 3 interceptions courtesy of Carson Palmer.

I don’t care that Tim Tebow doesn’t have a group of good NFL receivers. If you can’t throw a 10 yard out on target then it doesn’t matter who you’re throwing the ball to. Tim Tebow was getting all day to throw against the Jets yet he was still having more trouble hitting his man than an out of football, overweight Jamarcus Russell.

I feel for John Elway. John Elway was clapping when Tebow scored the go-ahead touchdown but his eyes were filled with disappointment. He wants the Tebow experiment to fail and I don’t blame him. The way Tebow plays isn’t sustainable. He knows it.

John Elway knows that you can’t teach accuracy.

Related: What to Make of Mr. Tebow’s Wild Ride?

Cartoon steam comes out of John Elway’s ears whenever he sees Tebow throw the ball. His elongated motion is disgusting. It’s as if Tebow is throwing in epic movie hero slow motion. The problem for Timmy T is that the blitz doesn’t also come in slow motion.

With the Broncos next two games featuring the Chargers and Vikings, it’s entirely plausible that Denver could be sitting at 7-5 atop the AFC West going into their Week 14 game versus the Bears.

However, a 7-5 record still shouldn’t mean Bronco fans can be too optimistic. This unsustainable style of play is only stalling the inevitable realization they will either have to go in another direction or that Jesus…err Tebow needs to drastically improve. Emphasis on the drastically.

The 4-1 Broncos with Tebow as their starter simply means the Broncos most likely won’t be looking at Matt Barkley or Landry Jones come the 2012 draft.

4-1 doesn’t say anything about the Broncos ability to win playoff games, which, by the way, is something they won’t be able to do with Tebow. Squeaking out tight victories against weak teams, that does nothing more than put another notch in the legendary Tebow belt, doesn’t win Super Bowls.

There is no doubt a lot of magical talent within Tim Tebow. Unfortunately, Tebow’s weekly magic gig will soon run its course and it will be time for another act to take his place in the mile high city.

Agree? Disagree? If you have any questions, comments, suggestions, please feel free to reply in the comments section below. Or you can e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com. Also, follow me on twitter @paintstheblack and I will happily return the favour.

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Don’t Suck For Me…Or Else

Andrew Luck is worried.

Well, at least he should be.

“Suck for Luck” is sweeping the nation. According to Luck, this doesn’t concern him too much. He is just going to go out each week, play his game and continue striving for a national championship.

In theory, the Heisman candidate shouldn’t be wasting his time and energy on which city could be his new zip code for the next 15 years. In theory, he is going to be drafted onto an awful team. Too bad for Andrew Luck the Indianapolis Colts are screwing with the nature of the NFL draft.

Luck is saying all the right things but we know all too well that the Colts would be a devastating landing spot for the Stanford product. To Luck, going to Indianapolis would make him feel like he was kicked in the groin by Minnesota Vikings defensive end Brian Robinson. He can ask T.J. Lang how that feels.

With 6 teams – the Dolphins, Jaguars, Vikings, Rams, Cardinals and Colts – still firmly entrenched in the “Suck for Luck” sweepstakes, you would have to put Colts as one of the frontrunners after 7 weeks.

The Dolphins and Colts are the two favourite heavyweights in the ‘suckiest be luckiest’ division. But after the thorough beat down the Colts took at the hand of the New Orleans Saints, 62-7 on Sunday night, the Colts might have Vegas giving them the best imaginary odds to take it all.

I don’t think I can remember an instance in my lifetime where Peyton Manning and quarterback controversy was used in the same sentence.

Andrew Luck got into Stanford. He’s smart enough to know that he doesn’t want to be part of one of those. He can ask Aaron Rodgers how that feels.

However, it would be ironic if the first player touted a once-in-a-decade talent since Peyton Manning ended up fighting it out with him for the starting job.

Nevertheless, an ironic situation isn’t topping Andrew Luck’s NFL aspirations bucket list. For his own sake, Luck must make sure he doesn’t ever have to face that ironic situation. He has the power to prevent it but his personality might stop him from doing so.

Barring any unforeseen circumstances, there is no doubt that Andrew Luck will be ready to start week 1 of the 2012 season. Heck, he would have been ready to start week 1 of the 2011 season. I still believe he should have come out last year. Maybe he didn’t want to go to Carolina but it has got to hurt a little bit to see Cam Newton have such a successful first half of the season.

The thing is, Cam Newton is exactly the reason that Andrew Luck can’t let himself end up in Indianapolis. Consider this, 4 quarterbacks drafted in 2011 and 8 quarterbacks drafted since 2010 are currently starting in the NFL. It would be crazy if Luck wasn’t starting week 1 of 2012.

No one knows how many years Peyton Manning has left, especially following 3 neck surgeries. Although, if we have learned anything about Peyton we know that he wants Brett Favre longevity, which doesn’t bode well for Andrew Luck.

Luck foolishly proved that he is a selfless individual by returning to Stanford for another unnecessary year. He doesn’t need to prove it again.

Related: Make the Right Decision Andrew Luck

At some point, but not yet, he is going to have to speak up and tell the world that he will not sign with the Indianapolis Colts if Peyton Manning is there. A selfish ultimatum from a selfless individual. Yeah, he might be criticized by some for a move like that but it would be worth it in the long run.

The other Manning wouldn’t sign with the Chargers. His reputation wasn’t tarnished by his refusal to sign. He won a Super Bowl.

Even if the Colts ended up taking Luck, fully intending to trade him, is there really a guarantee that some team is willing to pay the inevitably mammoth price to get him? The 2012 draft is projected to be one saturated with quarterback talent. Well known prospects Matt Barkley out of USC and Oklahoma’s Landry Jones round out the top 3 quarterbacks.

Is the price for Luck really worth it when other potential stars are available in Jones and Barkley?

What about the possibility of stepping into Peyton Manning’s shoes following a trade of the Colts legend?

If Peyton Manning were traded to allow Andrew Luck to start in his rookie year, the expectations and animosity surrounding Luck among Colts fans would be tremendous. While I’m sure Luck would be able to handle the increased stress, the conditions are certainly not ideal for a quarterback with so much already on his shoulders.

Playing in a Miami or Jacksonville type city would allow for a certain degree of patience that wouldn’t be accepted in Indianapolis.

It could be argued that learning behind one of the great minds in NFL history would be beneficial to Andrew Luck. Much like playing behind Brett Favre seems to have been most helpful to Aaron Rodgers.

Despite the possible advantage sitting out 2-4 years could have for Andrew Luck, his situation is far from similar to Rodgers. People tend to forget that Aaron Rodgers slipped all the way down to 24th overall in the year he was drafted. For some reason that I can’t quite put my finger on, I don’t see Luck slipping to 24th overall. Rodgers was not touted as a once-in-a-generation talent, he didn’t have the power to demand better circumstances and are we seriously supposed to believe Rodgers wouldn’t be the quarterback he is today if not for those years riding the pine.

If Luck is as great as they say he is, he can, should and will be able to learn on the job.

Andrew Luck doesn’t have to cost himself precious years of a football career that could potentially be one of the best in history.

All he has to do is speak up.

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Wake-up Call

At 28 years of age Cameron Wake is finally establishing himself in the NFL

By: Chris Ross

Robert Frost once wrote “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I – I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.” Well the same can be said for Miami Dolphins Linebacker Cameron Wake. Cameron Wake’s route to the NFL is as unconventional as it gets, but now that he has arrived he is taking the league by storm.

Unlike many NFLers, from a young age Cameron Wake did not dream of being a football star, rather he had high hopes of being a basketball player. However, he was unable to crack the starting roster in high school that consisted of current NBA player Keith Bogans. Wake reluctantly switched to football despite never having played, and as a senior he was named the Washington Post defensive player of the year.

Wake played well enough to earn a spot on the Penn State Nittany Lion’s roster as a true freshman in 2000. Blessed with great athletic ability, Wake was able to be a solid player at Penn State despite his limitations caused by his lack of football background. He finished his college career with 118 solo tackles, 8.5 sacks, and an astounding 7 blocked kicks.

Even though Wake had decent numbers and showed incredible athletic ability he was not taken in the 2005 NFL draft. This had much to do with the fact that Cameron was your typical ‘tweener’ player physically. Wake left college just over 230 pounds and at 6”3 he was too big to be a linebacker and too small to play defensive end. It should be of note that at Penn State’s pro day Cameron Wake ran a 4.55 in the 40 yard dash and sports a 45.5” vertical.

He was signed by the New York Giants as a free agent but was subsequently released before training camp even began. No one else bothered to give Wake a chance and for two years he was out of football. He worked as a mortgage advisor as well as a personal trainer, hoping to stay in shape just in case a call came.

In 2007 opportunity came knocking as the Canadian Football League’s B.C. Lions offered Cameron Wake a tryout. However, there was a miscommunication and Cameron showed up at the wrong facility. In spite of this, after watching some of Wake’s game film from Penn State, the B.C. Lions decided to extend him an invitation to training camp. The opportunity was all that Cameron Wake needed.

Wake flourished as a rookie in a league that has produced the likes of Warren Moon and Jeff Garcia. He moved from linebacker to defensive end and in his first year Wake finished the season with 16 sacks and 72 tackles. With high expectations going into his second season Wake did not experience the dreaded sophomore slump as he continued his dominance, and completed the season with a league high 23 sacks as well as taking home defensive player of the year honours. During his time in B.C., Wake was constantly faced with double and triple teams by opposing teams but managed to fight his way through them week after week. Moreover, in the CFL, a league designed for passing, defenders are forced to line up 1 yard off the ball creating a considerable advantage for offensive lineman.

Cameron Wake dominated during his tenure with the British Columbia Lions

As a B.C. Lion season ticket holder myself I was able to see the emergence of Cameron Wake on a game-to-game basis, and let me tell you that he is one of, if not the most exciting defensive player to come to the CFL. It wasn’t just the sacks; it was the distress that he caused opposing teams’ quarterbacks, offensive lines, coaches, and game plans. Someone as electrifying as Wake does not come around every day and the fact that he was playing in the CFL did not take away from the undeniable evidence that this was a star in the making.

His monster season in the CFL drew the interest of many NFL teams (17 to be exact), where he eventually landed in Miami signing a four-year deal worth up to $5 million, with around $1 million of that guaranteed.

With the move to the NFL came a move in positions once again for Cameron Wake as he had to make the transition back to outside linebacker. Playing behind Joey Porter, Wake was able to be slowly inserted into the Dolphins rotation and get re-accustomed with the American game. In limited playing time last year Cameron Wake confirmed what he accomplished in the CFL was no fluke. He ended the season with 5.5 sacks, 23 total tackles with 1 forced fumble.

Now, with the departure of Joey Porter, Wake has assumed the starting outside linebacker role in the Dolphins line-up and through 2 games this year he has not disappointed. He has already accumulated 2.5 sacks and a forced fumble, showing that he is ready to take the next step.

Cameron Wake’s road to the NFL is certainly one that has been traveled by few others, and now that he has made it he is finally turning heads around NFL circles and proving one game at a time that he truly does belong.

Agree? Disagree? If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please feel free to reply in the comments section below. Or you can e-mail me at cross_can15@hotmail.com. I’m now on twitter follow me @paintstheblack and I will gladly return the favour.

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